Feature

January 16, 2015

Frank van Diggelen: Riding the GNSS Wave

Running San Francisco Marathon, with daughter, Tanera. Note GPS watch.

SIDEBAR: Frank van Diggelen’s Compass Points

“It all traces back to my parents,” says Frank van Diggelen. “My father, Tromp van Diggelen, was a surfer. He taught me to surf and swim, in that order, when I was five. I was racing sailboats before I was 10, and there’s a lot of navigation there. Even when you’re just on a lake, the racing is all about reading the wind, understanding angles of convergence, velocity-made-good, and so on.”

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By Inside GNSS
September 24, 2014

Kingfisher

Eugenia Acosta, an intern with Clearpath Robotics, unloads a Kingfisher unmanned vessel in preparation for a mission (top photo), the Kingfisher components and controller (bottom photo).

“Our products are robotic research platforms,” says Clearpath’s Meghan Hennessey. “These can be configured and programmed so that our customers can explore their particular areas of interest without all the cost and troubleshooting involved in actually building robots themselves.”

Hennessey says Clearpath platforms — which include the all-terrain Husky, the larger, tractor-like Grizzly and the waterborne Kingfisher — can be thought of as project kits.

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By Inside GNSS
September 17, 2014

Alison Brown: Tally Ho! The Hunt for GNSS Innovations

In 2005, Alison Brown was the first Sidney Sussex College woman alumna to be named as an honorary Fellow in recognition of her distinguished technical contributions. Pictured here with Keith Glover, now head of engineering at Cambridge University, who taught Brown control systems engineering, and Donald Green, her director of studies while she was an undergraduate.

SIDEBAR: Alison Brown’s Compass Points

On display in the Smithsonian’s “Time and Navigation” exhibit in Washington D.C. is the world’s first GPS-enabled cell phone. It was developed in 1995 by NAVSYS Corporation, a Colorado GNSS and inertial R& D company, as part of the push to build a national emergency notification system for mobile users, E911.

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By Inside GNSS
August 19, 2014

Virginia: Autonomous Technology

David Schmale, an associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech uses unmanned aircraft to take samples of microbes that populate clouds.

1. The Team
The Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership, led by Virginia Tech, is the combined effort of Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey.

2. Research Centers
Virginia Tech, University of Maryland, Rutgers University, National Institute of Aerospace, Liberty University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rowan University, The Richard Stockton College of NJ, Virginia State University.

3. Test Ranges

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By Inside GNSS

North Dakota: Communications and Electronics

A University of North Dakota researcher totes a ScanEagle during a day of testing.

1. The Team
The state’s lieutenant governor chairs the Northern Plains Unmanned Systems Authority, which manages the state’s test range effort. The University of North Dakota is the leading research member of the group, which also includes North Dakota State University, the Office of the Adjutant General, North Dakota Aeronautics Commission and the North Dakota Department of Commerce.

2. Research Centers
University of North Dakota, North Dakota State University.

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By Inside GNSS

New York: Testing and Evaluation

1. The Team
Airspace Integration Research (NUAIR) Alliance leads a consortium of more than 50 universities, companies and facilities supporting testing on unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in New York and Massachusetts. The group includes firms like Lockheed Martin, Raytheon and Helios as well as research organizations such as Draper Laboratory and the Air Force Research Labs Information Directorate. More than 20 colleges and universities contribute to NUAIR.

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By Inside GNSS
August 8, 2014

Nevada: Unmanned Aircraft Standards

A UNR researcher monitors a small UAV.

1. The Team
The Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development is leading the unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test range effort. The team’s core comprises three major academic centers plus industrial expertise gained supporting military unmanned aircraft programs.

2. Test Ranges Include

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By Inside GNSS

Alaska: Remote Sensing

Flight testing ACUASI’s OpenRaven unmanned vehicle in Alaska.

1. The Team
The Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range complex is likely the largest of the FAA test ranges both in terms of its number of participants and its geographic coverage. The University of Alaska Fairbanks manages the team, which comprises some 59 contributors including Oregon and Hawaii as well as the countries of Norway, Ireland and Canada.

2. Test Ranges Include

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By Inside GNSS

Test Sites: The Select Six

ALASKA
Remote Sensing

1. The Team
The Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range complex is likely the largest of the FAA test ranges both in terms of its number of participants and its geographic coverage. The University of Alaska Fairbanks manages the team, which comprises some 59 contributors including Oregon and Hawaii as well as the countries of Norway, Ireland and Canada.

Read More >

By Inside GNSS