201401 January/February 2014

January 19, 2014

Ionospheric Scintillation

Ionospheric scintillations are rapid temporal fluctuations in both amplitude and phase of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals caused by the scattering of irregularities in the distribution of electrons encountered along the radio propagation path. The occurrence of scintillation has large day-to-day variability. The most severe scintillations are observed near the poles (at auroral latitudes) and near the equator (within ± 20 degrees of geomagnetic equator).

Read More >

By Inside GNSS

Proposal for U.S. eLoran Service Gains Ground

Trying to revive a years-dead federal program is usually the kind of hopeless task that even Sisyphus wouldn’t touch.

But determined supporters of eLoran are gaining ground in their effort to resurrect the cancelled radio-navigation network and, propelled by new worries over GPS jamming, they appear poised push the issue through.

Read More >

By Dee Ann Divis