Raytheon UK Announces Upgraded GPS Anti-Jam Technology

Raytheon UK launched a new enhanced version of its battlefield GPS L1/L2 anti-jam (GPS-AJ) capability, Landshield, this week (October 13–15) at the annual conference of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA 2014) in Washington, D.C.

A multi-element antenna with the anti-jam processing in a single small “one-box” form factor that interfaces at the RF level, Landshield is designed to enable GPS equipment to function unimpaired against a full range of hostile jammer types including narrow band, broadband, continuous wave, pulse, swept, and spectrally matched.

Raytheon UK launched a new enhanced version of its battlefield GPS L1/L2 anti-jam (GPS-AJ) capability, Landshield, this week (October 13–15) at the annual conference of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA 2014) in Washington, D.C.

A multi-element antenna with the anti-jam processing in a single small “one-box” form factor that interfaces at the RF level, Landshield is designed to enable GPS equipment to function unimpaired against a full range of hostile jammer types including narrow band, broadband, continuous wave, pulse, swept, and spectrally matched.

Primarily a military product based on a custom-built application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), the main customer market areas for Landshield is the land military vehicle arena. Despite its title, how, Raytheon says the product is not restricted to the land market and has also been developed for application for missiles and UAV/UAS platforms.

Raytheon developed the new capability to address the U.S. Army’s nascent Assured Position Navigation and Timing (APNT) program of record, for which the company will deliver a number of systems for evaluation in early 2015.  The requirement follows a presidential directive that all U.S. forces should be able to operate in a GPS denied or constrained environment.

According to Raytheon, new GPS-AJ systems could be integrated into nearly 40 percent of U.S. Army land vehicles. Landshield also includes technology allowing it to operate under rotor modulation conditions on combat helicopters.

Image