legacy-application

September 26, 2017

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

1. Mangrove Tree-Planting Drones
Myanmar (Southeast Asia)

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By Inside GNSS

GSA’s GNSS Opinion Leaders

Bernhard Richter, Leica Geosystems GNSS business director
Enrico Salvatori, Qualcomm Europe
Carlo Bagnoli, STMicroelectronics

Multinational semiconductor and telecommunications company Qualcomm is a world leader in the design and marketing of 3G, 4G and next-generation wireless technologies. Headquartered in San Diego, California, Qualcomm has been widening its footprint in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region, with a core focus in Europe.

“We expect to grow Qualcomm’s presence in Europe, becoming a major EU (European Union) player in the digitization of European industries,” said Qualcomm senior vice president and president of Qualcomm Europe, Enrico Salvatori.

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By Inside GNSS
August 10, 2017

GSA’s GNSS Opinion Leaders

Bernhard Richter, Leica Geosystems GNSS business director
Enrico Salvatori, Qualcomm Europe
Carlo Bagnoli, STMicroelectronics

Carlo Bagnoli is Director of Infotainment BU System and Applications at STMicroelectronics. The company is a global semiconductor leader focusing on smart driving and the internet of things, creating intelligent and energy-efficient products that enable intelligent transport as well as smarter factories, cities and homes.

Within the infotainment business unit, Bagnoli and his team work to develop positioning receivers, broadcast receivers and communication processors for the automotive market. Doing so means gathering GNSS signals from far and wide.

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By Inside GNSS
April 9, 2017

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

1. ANTARCTIC OASIS
Antarctic Peninsula

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By Inside GNSS
April 1, 2017

Ligado Test Results Roll In

Figures and Charts

The GPS community and Virginia-based Ligado are weighing new and upcoming test results as the standoff over interference with satellite navigation services enters its seventh year.

The dispute centers on the company’s now modified proposal to build a terrestrial wireless network supported by frequencies originally allocated for satellites. Though there had been a move some years earlier to augment the satellite services with ground stations the company’s first plan envisioned some 30,000 high-powered ground terminals.

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By Dee Ann Divis
January 26, 2017

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

Tracking illegal logging in Romania, autonomous mining, ancient calendars and Canadian cows

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By Inside GNSS
January 24, 2017

Is it possible to build a low-cost system to detect and locate a single GNSS jammer in near-real time?

Q: Is it possible to build a low-cost system to detect and locate a single GNSS jammer in near-real time?

A: GNSS jammers are an ongoing threat to the reliable use of GNSS. The problem of geolocating GNSS jammers can be addressed using a time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) processing technique; however, this problem is quite different than geolocating jammers in other radio frequency systems. The two main differences are:

(1) No GNSS are available to use as a timing reference.

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By Inside GNSS
January 23, 2017

Positioning Technology in Australia Gets a $12 Million Boost

SBAS illustration with the GNSS satellites (upper left) and the communications satellite (upper right).

With the Australian government’s announcement earlier this month that it would invest $12 million in a two-year program looking into the future of positioning technology in Australia, comes plans for testing of satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS) to be undertaken, and for future applications for all four major modes of transport in Australia, as well as for potential safety, productivity, efficiency and environmental benefits.

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By Inside GNSS
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