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Inside GNSS • September/October 2007

The MBOC Modulation

As emphasized in the European Commission (EC) “white paper” on European transport policy for 2010, the European Union (EU) needs an independent satellite navigation system. Galileo is Europe’s contribution to the global navigation satellite system of systems (GNSS) and has committed itself from the very beginning to developing a signal plan that would provide sufficient independence from GPS, while also being compatible and interoperable with it.

GNSS Solutions • September/October 2007

eLoran and Signal Reception Under Snow

Q: How well can GPS signals penetrate avalanche snow?

A: Surprisingly, GPS signals penetrate avalanche snow very well.

Working Papers • September/October 2007

Authenticating GNSS: Proofs against Spoofs, Part 2

The emergence of a multi-GNSS world will inevitably require the civil GNSS user community to address the issue of signal authentication: confirming that a pretended identity of a user or transmitted information is, in fact, real and correct.

This two-part column focuses on the concepts and methods for achieving authentication in GNSS operations. In the July/August issue, the column began by introducing some of the cryptographic concepts, terminology, and techniques used to develop and implement authentication methods in navigation systems in general.

Human Engineering • September/October 2007

Karl Kovach: Keeper of the Code

Karl Kovach may be the only person who can claim that he helped design every single one of the Navstar GPS navigation signals.

Recognized by GPS cognoscenti as high priest of the ICD, systems engineer Kovach serves as one of the chief keepers of the GPS Interface Control Documents, the technical specification bible for GPS signals and the essential guide for GPS receiver manufacturers. And that’s not all — the U.S. Air Force’s high-altitude, long-range unmanned air vehicle Global Hawk lands itself, thanks to an innovation Kovach patented in 2003.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

U.S. Air Force Releases GPS Block IIIA Satellite RFP

After several false starts in the previous months and a multi-year delay in the overall GPS III architecture development, the GPS Wing (formerly the GPS Joint Program Office) announced on July 12 the release of a request for proposal for the development and production of the GPS Block IIIA satellites.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

GPS + GLONASS for Precision

The SC Geodetic Survey (SCGS) has combined the technologies of the GPS, GLONASS, cellular communications and high-speed server networks to provide centimeter-level accuracy in real-time for surveying, mapping, and engineering applications.

Working Papers • July/August 2007

Authenticating GNSS: Proofs against Spoofs, Part 1

Authentication is an essential problem in the field of communication: confirming that a pretended identity of a user or transmitted information does, in fact, really correspond to the true identity or source.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

More Compass Points: Tracking China’s MEO Satellite on a Hardware Receiver

In 2000 China deployed the Beidou-1 navigation system. Originally this S-band system provided ranging information via geostationary satellites that operate as transponders. This system design required bulky two-way radios, had a limited capacity, and coverage was restricted to East Asia.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

GNSS Over China: The Compass MEO Satellite Codes

On April 14, 2007 (local time), China launched the Compass M-1 satellite. This satellite represents the first of a new global navigation satellite system (GNSS) that is planned to have a total of 35 satellites. Unlike prior Chinese navigation satellites, Compass M-1 broadcasts in L-band, using signal structures similar to other GNSS systems and sharing frequencies near to or overlapping those of GPS, Galileo, and GLONASS.

Inside GNSS • May/June 2007

Opening the GATE

Nestled amid the slopes and valleys of southeastern Germany’s precipitous Alps, a novel installation has taken form over the past three years that will allow receiver designers and application developers to have real-world experience with Galileo signals years before Europe’s GNSS becomes operational.

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