engineering

Towards Navigation Safety for Autonomous Cars

Figures 1 – 6, Table 1

There are many good reasons for getting excited about highly automated vehicles, or HAVs, which is the acronym used by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). HAVs can make driving more fuel- and time-efficient. They can significantly reduce traffic congestion and emissions by driving a precise speed, minimizing lane changes, and maintaining an exact distance to neighboring cars. They can also increase accessibility and mobility for disabled and elderly persons.

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By Inside GNSS
April 9, 2017

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

1. ANTARCTIC OASIS
Antarctic Peninsula

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By Inside GNSS
January 26, 2017

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

Tracking illegal logging in Romania, autonomous mining, ancient calendars and Canadian cows

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By Inside GNSS
January 24, 2017

Is it possible to build a low-cost system to detect and locate a single GNSS jammer in near-real time?

Q: Is it possible to build a low-cost system to detect and locate a single GNSS jammer in near-real time?

A: GNSS jammers are an ongoing threat to the reliable use of GNSS. The problem of geolocating GNSS jammers can be addressed using a time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) processing technique; however, this problem is quite different than geolocating jammers in other radio frequency systems. The two main differences are:

(1) No GNSS are available to use as a timing reference.

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By Inside GNSS
January 11, 2017

Spirent Announces New GNSS/GPS Testing Software

Spirent Communications’ PT TestBench.

Spirent Communications plc has announced the availability of PT TestBench — software designed to help technology, system and application developers build more accurate positioning functions more quickly. According to the company, the testing, analysis and reporting package automates testing of GPS and other global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers, so higher quality systems are brought to market faster and more reliably.

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By Inside GNSS
December 27, 2016

Air Force Continues to Test GPS III Satellite

GPS III satellites in production. Image Source: Lockheed Martin.

The U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) says it continues to work on GPS III ceramic capacitor testing and plans to have an updated launch schedule published late next month.

As Inside GNSS reported, the first GPS III satellite’s delivery, originally scheduled for August, was delayed by four months because of a Lockheed Martin subcontractor’s failure to test a ceramic capacitor.

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By Inside GNSS
November 21, 2016

Hitachi Uses Trimble Grade Control System

Trimble GSC900 Allows Precision Excavation

Trimble has announced that the Hitachi Construction Machinery’s ZX200X-5B semi-automatic excavator is now available in Japan with the GCS900 Grade Control System.

The system uses GNSS, laser, sonic, or total station technology, to position the heavy machinery’s blade or bucket in real-time, for significant reduction in material overages and improving the contractor’s productivity, the company said. The unit makes design surfaces, grades, and alignments accessible to the operator inside a cab, Trimble said.

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By Inside GNSS
November 2, 2016

AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2017

The Winspear Opera House and the Meyerson Symphony Center in the Downtown Dallas Arts District

AUVSI’s XPONENTIAL 2017, All Things Unmanned will take place at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, Texas, U.S.A. from May 8 – 11, 2017.

Online registration is open. Early bird registration ends November 30, 2016. Onsite registration will be available.

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By Inside GNSS
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