Galileo Archives - Page 2 of 62 - Inside GNSS - Global Navigation Satellite Systems Engineering, Policy, and Design

Galileo

July 27, 2020

Galileo Saved in Latest EU Budget Slash

The European Commission cut its space budget for the next seven years but kept the Galileo and Copernicus satellite programs largely on track. The move came after intense negotiations over a 1.8-trillion-euro European Union budget seeking to absorb and remedy economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic.

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By Inside GNSS
July 17, 2020

MyGalileoDrone Contest Open For Submissions

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), the operational agency of the European Commission for Galileo and EGNOS, is launching its MyGalileoDrone competition on July 17. This contest is targeting the design and development of drone-based applications or services, using a Galileo-enabled receiver, that address the EU’s key priorities such as the Green Deal, and support the EU Recovery Plan for Europe.

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By Inside GNSS
July 14, 2020

UK Acquires OneWeb LEO Constellation, But Won’t Work for SatNav — Or Maybe It Will

Britain has signed a £900 million ($1.135 billion) deal to buy a part share of satellite operator OneWeb, a low-Earth orbit constellation in-the-making, designed to provide global high-speed broadband services. There had been speculation that the government intended thereby to generate its own satellite-based navigation signals, as it has been shut out of Galileo security signals by its Brexit move. Some satnav experts quickly dashed that notion, but others demonstrated that it just may be possible.

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By Inside GNSS
June 7, 2020

Galileo on PATROL for Driver and Road Safety

The Position Authenticated Tachograph foR OSNMA Launch (PATROL) project is developing the first external GNSS facility for smart tachographs, using Galileo’s new Open Service Authentication (OS-NMA). The tachograph, a device fitted to a vehicle that automatically records its speed and distance, together with the driver’s activity selected from a choice of modes, uses Galileo authentication to verify that the navigation data received from satellites is genuine.

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By Inside GNSS
May 25, 2020

Green Lane Speeds Border Crossings of Essential Goods

Galileo Green Lane, a new mobile app, facilitates the free movement of freight, reduces waiting times at European Union borders, and prioritizes essential goods during pandemic response. The app uses Galileo positioning services  to address the needs of border control authorities and truck drivers, with two intuitive user interfaces. The app was developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission.

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By Inside GNSS
May 14, 2020

British GNSS May Die A-borning

Britain’s own satellite navigation system, envisioned to fill the country’s Galileo void created by Brexit, may never see the light of day. Government officials don’t want to spend tax revenues to meet projected increasing costs.

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By Inside GNSS
May 11, 2020

Galileo Green Lane Speeds Border Crossings of Essential Goods

A new mobile app, Galileo Green Lane, facilitates the free movement of freight, reduces waiting times at European Union borders, and prioritizes essential goods during pandemic response. The app uses Galileo positioning services  to address the needs of border control authorities and truck drivers, with two intuitive user interfaces. The app was developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission.

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By Inside GNSS
April 9, 2020

NATO Software Estimates Areas of Degraded GNSS Service

Experts at the NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency have developed a software-based tool that can estimate the area where an interfering signal would degrade or deny GNSS signals, and assess the scale of the interfering signal and its potential impact on operations. Principally of interest are jamming or spoofing attacks on GPS or Galileo, of course.

The Radar Electromagnetic and Communication Coverage Tool (REACT), was sponsored by the NATO Navigation and Identification Programme of Work. It serves as a proof-of-concept of how analytical tools could support the execution of operations. The tool is also available to NATO Nations free of charge. For now, the software is only used for trial and experimentation.

NATO REACT, photo courtesy NCI
NATO REACT, photo courtesy NCI

To use the software, operators input information on the particular jammers – their locations and technical characteristics — and the software produces a map of the area where the interfering signals would degrade or deny GNSS receivers. This can be displayed on the NATO Core Geographical Information System (GIS) map.

The next phase of the project focuses on ensuring the software can work on NATO classified networks, which would make it more available to operational commands to test and ensure such support measures are properly integrated into NATO operations.

The software and its estimations were demonstrated to operators during exercise Trident Jupiter 2019, part 1, to collect their feedback. The exercise gathered 3,000 military and civilian personnel as participants, evaluators and observers. Thirty NATO member and partner nations participated in nine different exercise locations across Europe.

“Ten consecutive twelve-hour working days and a relentless, ever-increasing, battle-rhythm tempo came to an end as Exercise Trident Jupiter 2019-1 (TRJU19-1) reached completion on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019,” the agency stated.

TRJU19 was the largest and most complex exercise planned and executed by the Alliance’s Joint Warfare Centre to date. TRJU19-2 took place in March 2020.

“NATO’s adversaries have the ability to degrade or deny GPS-enabled capabilities,” said Jean-Philippe Saulay, a NATO Navigation and Identification Officer. “NATO must take appropriate measures to ensure Allied forces can operate in a degraded or denied environment.”

“NATO must maintain superiority in the electromagnetic environment, including but not limited to, positioning, navigation and timing services,” said Dr Enrico Casini, Communications and Navigation Engineer at the NCI Agency. “Situational awareness of navigation systems in a contested electromagnetic environment contributes to that superiority. NATO is enhancing its knowledge of electronic warfare technology,” Dr Casini said. “The electromagnetic environment has become even more contested in recent years. One aspect of that is interference with GNSS systems.”

Photos courtesy NATO Communications and Information Agency.

By Inside GNSS

Hidden Siblings of the GNSS

GPS keeps a digital twin sequestered in El Segundo, California. Galileo has an Earth-bound space vehicle in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, straining at its bonds, yearning to break free and fly with its brethren. Both constellation “ghosts” exist in an eerie testing twilight, being made to replicate the movements and reactions of their free-flying families. Their sacrifices could lead to better, more robust satellites in future generations.

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By Alan Cameron