IEC Announces New Miniaturized, Secure GPS Receiver Module

IEC Announces New Miniaturized, Secure GPS Receiver Module
IEC TruTrak Evolution GPS Receiver


L-3 Interstate Electronics Corporation (IEC)
, based in Anaheim, California, has announced its latest miniaturized GPS receiver, the TruTrak Evolution.

A single-board, L1/L2 24-channel secure GPS receiver, the TruTrak Evolution consists of a security module, radio frequency down converter and I/O logic. The receiver employs IEC’s latest key data processor (KDP II) SAASM chipset in the XFACTOR module to provide enhanced GPS security.


L-3 Interstate Electronics Corporation (IEC)
, based in Anaheim, California, has announced its latest miniaturized GPS receiver, the TruTrak Evolution.

A single-board, L1/L2 24-channel secure GPS receiver, the TruTrak Evolution consists of a security module, radio frequency down converter and I/O logic. The receiver employs IEC’s latest key data processor (KDP II) SAASM chipset in the XFACTOR module to provide enhanced GPS security.

The XFACTOR SAASM module is a secure tamper-resistant, multi-chip module that decodes the Department of Defense GPS Precise Positioning Service Signal. The TruTrak receivers also support the SAASM extended functions, according to IEC. The receiver’s advanced technology is designed to increase the performance and accuracy of precision guided projectiles, munitions, and land attack missiles under development in various government programs.

In addition to position, velocity and time (PVT), the TruTrak Evolution receiver also provides area navigation. According to the company, it features a very accurate time source for radio time division multiple access (TDMA) operation and specialized power management modes to optimize battery life, which are essential in portable handheld devices.

The receivers are designed and tested to survive rugged environmental conditions while maintaining exact performance requirements, such as precision timing within 10 microseconds, IEC says. The receivers’ mean time between failure is reportedly greater than 25,000 hours. The GPS Joint Program Office–approved security design provides a time-to-first-fix in less than 6 seconds (in the absence of jamming) and obtains stabilized measurements even in high-jamming environments, according to IEC.

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