GNSS Receivers Archives - Page 2 of 2 - Inside GNSS

GNSS Receivers

September 19, 2007

ITT SAASM Military Receiver

The Advanced System Improvement Program (ASIP) Embedded GPS Receiver (EGR) from ITT Corporation is a 12-channel Selective Availability-Anti-Spoofing Module (SAASM) GPS receiver using 3.3 volt technology. Designed for military surveying, navigation, and timing applications, the board features dual-frequency (L1/L2) all-in-view tracking with a reported Precise Positioning Service (PPS) accuracy of 10 meters, SEP (spherical error probability). It has RS422, RS232, and CMOS (2) serial ports, selectable 1 pps and 10 pps, time marks (UTC), and1 pps time-sync.

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By Glen Gibbons

NavCom Tech L1 GPS RTK Receiver

NavCom Technology offers its new SF-2110M and SF-2110R modular L1 StarFire GPS receivers. The SF-2110M has an integrated, compact dual-band antenna capable of receiving GPS and StarFire signals from NavCom’s global satellite-based augmentation system. The SF-2110R includes a separate L-Band antenna for enhanced StarFire signal reception in challenging environments and at high latitudes, according to the company. NavCom Technology Inc., Torrance, California USA.

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By Glen Gibbons

Cell-Guide Host-Based GPS

CellGuide Ltd. has launched the ACLYS GPS chip and host-based software. Designed to exploit the processors and other wireless components on mobile devices, ACLYS reportedly provides -160 dBm sensitivity and employs unique and proprietary navigation algorithms for accurate navigation even in demanding urban environments. Power management features reduce power consumption to less than 10mW in tracking mode, according to the company. ACLYS also operates with CellGuide’s long-term ephemeris technology to enable fast startups even when no cellular network is available.

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By Glen Gibbons
August 29, 2007

Navman Jupiter 32 GPS Chip

Navman offers the Jupiter 32, an autonomous 20-channel GPS module capable of delivering tracking capabilities reportedly better than –159 decibels per milliwatt. The unit, an update of the company’s Jupiter 30, combines a SiRF GSC3 GPS chipset with a radio-frequency frontend optimized with proprietary filtering, multipath mitigation, jammer elimination, and dynamic search control for severe environments. It measures 15.0 × 17.0 × 2.7 millimeters, weighs 2.0 grams, and achieves horizontal position accuracies of 2.2 meters (circular error probable).

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By Inside GNSS