Columns and Editorials

June 1, 2010

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

1. HERE KITTY, KITTY
Nassau County,New York USA
IEEE Spectrum blogger Mark Spezio attached a GPS logger to his wandering cat, whose complex journeys centered on a mouse-hunting paradise: Nassau County Storm Water Basin Storage Area. The cat was amazed to see Mark show up at his secret hideaway.

See cat and maps here 

Read More >

By Inside GNSS
May 31, 2010

Deselecting Unavailability

Only a decade ago, but a world away: 2000.

The last year of the old century that everyone thought was the first of the new.

When flying was still a delight, rather than a worrisome bother.

When the expected — a global Y2K bug–bitten IT meltdown — didn’t happen, and the much-anticipated but still-unexpected did: the United States turned off GPS selective availability.

Read More >

By Inside GNSS
October 16, 2007

Human Engineering

Human Engineering is an occasional feature that profiles GNSS engineers in industry, academia, the military and government.

Want to know someone’s favorite equation? Or how they discovered satellite navigation in their own careers? The popular notions about GNSS that annoy them most?

This is the place to look.

Read More >

By Inside GNSS
October 7, 2007

GNSS Solutions

“GNSS Solutions” is a regular column featuring questions and answers about technical aspects of GNSS.

Readers are invited to send their questions to columnist Mark Petovello, Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. He will find experts to answer those questions, which will be published in Inside GNSS.

Dr. Petovello is a professor at the university. He has been actively involved in many aspects of positioning and navigation since 1997.

Read More >

By Inside GNSS

Working Papers

This regular Inside GNSS column explores the technical and scientific themes that underpin Global Navigation Satellite System programs and applications.

It features analyses and discussions by engineers and researchers on topics ranging from GNSS interoperability to preferred technologies for GNSS receivers to antispoofing tools for GNSS signals.

The column is coordinated by Prof. Dr.-Ing Günter Hein, head of Galileo Operations and Evolution Department of the European Space Agency.

Read More >

By Inside GNSS
1 25 26 27