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Inside GNSS • September/October 2007

The MBOC Modulation

As emphasized in the European Commission (EC) “white paper” on European transport policy for 2010, the European Union (EU) needs an independent satellite navigation system. Galileo is Europe’s contribution to the global navigation satellite system of systems (GNSS) and has committed itself from the very beginning to developing a signal plan that would provide sufficient independence from GPS, while also being compatible and interoperable with it.

Working Papers • September/October 2007

Authenticating GNSS: Proofs against Spoofs, Part 2

The emergence of a multi-GNSS world will inevitably require the civil GNSS user community to address the issue of signal authentication: confirming that a pretended identity of a user or transmitted information is, in fact, real and correct.

This two-part column focuses on the concepts and methods for achieving authentication in GNSS operations. In the July/August issue, the column began by introducing some of the cryptographic concepts, terminology, and techniques used to develop and implement authentication methods in navigation systems in general.

Working Papers • July/August 2007

Authenticating GNSS: Proofs against Spoofs, Part 1

Authentication is an essential problem in the field of communication: confirming that a pretended identity of a user or transmitted information does, in fact, really correspond to the true identity or source.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

More Compass Points: Tracking China’s MEO Satellite on a Hardware Receiver

In 2000 China deployed the Beidou-1 navigation system. Originally this S-band system provided ranging information via geostationary satellites that operate as transponders. This system design required bulky two-way radios, had a limited capacity, and coverage was restricted to East Asia.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

GNSS Over China: The Compass MEO Satellite Codes

On April 14, 2007 (local time), China launched the Compass M-1 satellite. This satellite represents the first of a new global navigation satellite system (GNSS) that is planned to have a total of 35 satellites. Unlike prior Chinese navigation satellites, Compass M-1 broadcasts in L-band, using signal structures similar to other GNSS systems and sharing frequencies near to or overlapping those of GPS, Galileo, and GLONASS.

Inside GNSS • July/August 2007

Galileo’s New PPP: Public-Public Partnership?

Having abandoned — for the time being at least — attempts to attract private investment to the creation of Galileo’s infrastructure, European GNSS leaders are working to shape a Plan B that can gain support from the program’s extensive group of stakeholders.

Inside GNSS • May/June 2007

Opening the GATE

Nestled amid the slopes and valleys of southeastern Germany’s precipitous Alps, a novel installation has taken form over the past three years that will allow receiver designers and application developers to have real-world experience with Galileo signals years before Europe’s GNSS becomes operational.

Inside GNSS • May/June 2007

Speaking with Authority: Galileo's Lead Agency in a Changing World

Sometimes things don’t go as planned.

Thinking Aloud • May/June 2007

Don't Look Back

It might have been the segment from Martin Scorsese’s documentary on Bob Dylan, which I saw recently, that made me think of using this title for my comments.

More likely, however, it’s an echo from my long-gone days on the running track where any athlete worth his or her salt knows that when you come to the final stretch of the race, you shouldn’t look behind yourself.

Inside GNSS • May/June 2007

Galileo’s Plan B (and C)

A sea change appears to be taking place in Europe’s Galileo program as its political masters prepare to transform the struggling public-private partnership (PPP) into a more traditional institutional program wholly sponsored by the public sector.

That would move an additional €2.4 to €3 billion onto the public tax burden, but it might also represent the quickest route to completion of the GNSS project backed by the European Union (EU) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

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