201111 November/December 2011

November 21, 2011

GNSS Hotspots

One of 12 magnetograms recorded at Greenwich Observatory during the Great Geomagnetic Storm of 1859
1996 soccer game in the Midwest, (Rick Dikeman image)
Nouméa ground station after the flood
A pencil and a coffee cup show the size of NASA’s teeny tiny PhoneSat
Bonus Hotspot: Naro Tartaruga AUV
Pacific lamprey spawning (photo by Jeremy Monroe, Fresh Waters Illustrated)
“Return of the Bucentaurn to the Molo on Ascension Day”, by (Giovanni Antonio Canal) Canaletto
The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock at 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever AFB in Colorado. This photo was taken in January, 2006 during the addition of a leap second. The USNO master clocks control GPS timing. They are accurate to within one second every 20 million years (Satellites are so picky! Humans, on the other hand, just want to know if we’re too late for lunch) USAF photo by A1C Jason Ridder.
Detail of Compass/ BeiDou2 system diagram
Hotspot 6: Beluga A300 600ST

1. Portland, Oregon and Los Angeles, California USA
TWINS!

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By Inside GNSS

From Family Friendly to Seriously Scientific, GNSS Ideas Contest Rewards New Commercial Applications

The Arthurs. Named after science fiction icon Arthur C. Clarke, the custom-designed statuettes were awarded to the top five finalists in the USA Challenge. In 1956, Clarke foresaw the development of satellite-based positioning and navigation, writing to a friend that within 30 years an “orbital relay system” could take over all existing surface [communication] networks: “ . . .three stations in the 24-hour orbit could . . . make possible a position-finding grid whereby anyone on earth could locate himself by means of a couple of dials on an instrument about the size of a watch . . . no one on the planet need ever get lost.”

Return to main article: "True3D HUD Wins Global SatNav Competition"

The ideas ranged from the family friendly — a smartphone app that reads historical markers and travel tidbits as you drive by — to the seriously scientific — a new secure time reference authentication method (TRANM) for GNSS receivers.

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By Inside GNSS