Canadian Army Tests NovAtel’s GPS Anti-Jam Technology

Canadian Army Tests NovAtel's GPS Anti-Jam Technology
NovAtel’s GAJT-710ML antenna.

Calgary, Canada-based NovAtel Inc. announced that the Canadian Army has successfully tested its GPS Anti-Jam Technology (GAJT) in live-fire conditions on the M777C1 howitzer.

GAJT protects GPS-based navigation and precise timing receivers from intentional jamming and accidental interference, Novatel said. The unit features a null-forming antenna system, which ensure satellite signals necessary to compute position and time are always available, the company said.


Calgary, Canada-based NovAtel Inc. announced that the Canadian Army has successfully tested its GPS Anti-Jam Technology (GAJT) in live-fire conditions on the M777C1 howitzer.

GAJT protects GPS-based navigation and precise timing receivers from intentional jamming and accidental interference, Novatel said. The unit features a null-forming antenna system, which ensure satellite signals necessary to compute position and time are always available, the company said.

NovAtel said the technology, which is a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) product, comes in versions for land, sea, fixed installations, and smaller platforms such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). GAJT also works with civil and military receivers, and is M-Code-ready, so there is no need to replace existing GPS receivers, the company said.

The trial, conducted at Canadian Forces Base Shilo in Manitoba, was held in conjuncton with the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP). The program helps companies to bridge the pre-commercialization gap by procuring and testing late-stage goods and services within the Canadian government before taking them to market, NovAtel said.

The M777C1 lightweight 155-millimeter towed howitzer is equipped with an advanced digital gun management system to enable a crew to engage targets, particularly when employing precision-guided munitions that use location data from GPS satellites, NovAtel said.

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